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Cold Florida temps causing iguanas to ‘freeze,’ fall out of trees

1515203160 cold florida temps causing iguanas to freeze fall out of trees - Cold Florida temps causing iguanas to 'freeze,' fall out of trees

The temperature levels in the Sunshine State have actually gotten so cold that iguanas are freezing and falling out of trees.

Temperatures in Florida dipped listed below 40 degrees Fahrenheit early Thursday in parts of South Florida, according to the National Weather Service in Miami.

Apparently, the temperature levels were cold adequate to paralyze green iguanas typical in Miami’s suburban areas.

PalmBeach Post writer Frank Cerabino tweeted a photo of a reptile lying belly-up next to his pool. WPEC-TV published images of another iguana on its back on a Palm Beach County roadway.

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KristenSommers, who supervises the non-native fish and wildlife program for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission informed The Associated Press the cold-blooded lizards begin to get slow when temperature levels fall listed below 50 degrees Fahrenheit.

Besidesiguanas struggling with the cold, sea turtles likewise stiffen up when temperature levels drop. The wildlife commission’s biologists have actually been saving cold-stunned sea turtles discovered drifting listlessly on the water or near coast, however no such rescue was prepared for iguanas.

Officials have actually cautioned locals to leave the iguanas alone if they discover them because they might feel threatened and bite when they heat up.

“Don’t assume that they’re dead,”Sommers stated.

Greeniguanas are an intrusive types in Florida understood for penetrating landscaping and digging burrows that weaken facilities. They can grow over 5 feet (1.5 meters) long, and their droppings can be a prospective source of salmonella germs, which triggers gastrointestinal disorder.

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The wildlife commission stated the lizards might be much easier to catch today.

“This provides an opportunity to capture some, but I’m not sure it’s going to be cold enough for long enough to make enough of a difference,”Sommers stated. “In most cases, they’re going to warm back up and move around again, unless they’re euthanized.”

In2010, a two-week cold wave with temperature levels listed below 40 degrees in South Florida eliminated lots of iguanas, in addition to Burmese pythons and other intrusive family pets that grow in the state’s subtropical environment.

TheAssociated Press contributed to this report.

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